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Diagnostic Salivary DHEA ELISA Kit (CE Mark)

Technical Summary

Assay Protocol
Rev. 03.02.18
Specifications
Catalog#: 1-2212
Regulatory Status: CE Mark
Format: 96-well plate
Assay Time: ~ 4 hrs
Sample Volume/Test: 50 µL
Sensitivity: 5 pg/mL
Assay Range: 10.2 pg/mL - 1000 pg/mL
Storage Requirements: 2-8°C
Tests Per Kit
Singlet: 76
Duplicate: 38
Target Analyte
Technical Documentation

References & Salivary DHEA Research

    1. Kroboth, P.D., Salek, F.S., Pittenger, A.L., et al. (1999).  DHEA and DHEA-S: A review.  J Clin Pharmacol, 39(4), 327-48.
    2. Labrie, F. (2010).  DHEA, important source of sex steroids in men and even more in women.  Prog Brain Res, 182, 97-148.
    3. Labrie, F., Bélanger, A., Cusan, L., Candas, B. (1997).  Physiological changes in dehydroepiandrosterone are not reflected by serum levels of active androgens and estrogens but of their metabolites: Intracrinology.  J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 82(8), 2403-9.
    4. Labrie, F., Luu-The, V. Bélanger, A., et al. (2005).  Is dehydroepiandrosterone a hormone? J Endocrinol, 187, 169-96.
    5. Maninger, N., Wolkowitz, O.M., Reus, V.I., et al. (2009). Neurobiological and neuropsychiatric effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEAS).  Front Neuroendocrinol, 30(1), 65-91.
    6. Dillon, J.S. (2005).  Dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and related steroids: Their role in inflammatory, allergic and immunological disorders.  Curr Drug Targets Infl Allergy, 4(3), 377-85.
    7. Widstrom, R., Dillon, J.S. (2004).  Is there a receptor for dehydroepiandrosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate?  Semin Repro Med, 22(4), 289-98.
    8. Baulieu, E.-E., Robel, P. (1998). Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA) as neuroactive neurosteroids.  Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 95(8), 4089-91.
    9. Charalampopoulos, I., Alexaki, V.-I., Tsatsanis, C., et al. (2006). Neurosteroids as endogenous inhibitors of neuronal cell apoptosis in aging.  Ann N Y Acad Sci, 1088, 139-52.
    10. Izawa, S. Sugaya, N., Shirotsuki, K., et al. (2008).  Salivary dehydroepiandrosterone secretion in response to acute psychosocial stress and its correlations with biological and psychological changes.  Biol Psych, 79(3), 294-98.

    1. Goodyer, I.M., Herbert, J., Altham, P.M., et al. (1996). Adrenal secretion during major depression in 8- to 16-year-olds, I. Altered diurnal rhythms in salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) at presentation. Psychol Med, 26(2), 245-56.
    2. Young, A.H., Gallagher, P., Porter, R. (2002). Elevation of the cortisol-dehydroepiandrosterone ratio in drug-free depressed patients.  Am J Psychiatry, 159(7), 1237-39.
    3. Harris, D.S., Wolkowitz, O.M., Reus, V.I. (2001). Movement disorder, memory, psychiatric symptoms and serum DHEA levels in schizophrienic and schizoaffective patients.  World J Biol Psychiatry, 2(2), 99-102.
    4. Christeff, N., Gherbi, N., Mammes, O., et al. (1997). Serum cortisol and DHEA concentrations during HIV infection.  Psychoneuroendocrinology, 22 (Suppl. 1), S11-18.
    5. Rosenfeld, R.S., Rosenberg, B.J., Fukushima, D.K., Hellman, L. (1975).  24-Hour secretory pattern of dehydroisoandrosterone and dehydroisoandrosterone sulfate.       J Clin Endocrinol Metab, 40(5), 850-5.
    6. Longcope, C. (1995). Metabolism of dehydroepiandrosterone.  Ann N Y Acad Sci, 774, 143-48.
    7. Simon, J.A. (2002). Estrogen replacement therapy: Effect on the endogenous androgen milieu.  Fertil Steril, 77 (Suppl 4), S77-82.)
    8. Vining, R.F., McGinley, R.A., Symons, R.G. (1983). Hormones in saliva: Mode of entry and consequent implications for clinical interpretation.  Clin Chem, 29(10), 1752-56.
    9. Shirtcliff, E.A., Granger, D.A., Schwartz, E., Curran, M.J. (2001). Use of salivary biomarkers in biobehavioral research: Cotton-based sample collection methods can interfere with salivary immunoassay results.  Psychoneuroendocrinology, 26(2), 165-73.)